How to Measure Bra Size

How to Measure Bra Size

Are you worried about the How to Measure Bra Size? If you’re reading this, you almost certainly know as well as any other woman that judgment your bra size isn’t as clear-cut as you are once considered.

Your bra size has likely changed all the way through your life, which can happen for a number of reasons including unpredictable weight and having children.

Serving other women learn how to measure bra size is part of what got us here. By learning the different shapes, sizes, and measurements of millions of women, we created bras without comparison reassure, and support.

In this article, we’re going to break down how to measure your bra size in three easy steps so that the next time you go bra shopping, you’ll have a better idea of what to look for when trying to find your best-fitting bra.

What is Bra Size

A bra size consists of two measurements: a band size and a cup size. It is a standardized way to describe the fit of a bra, indicating the band size (the measurement around your ribcage, just below your bust) and the cup size (the difference between the measurement around your bust and your band size).

For example, in the United States and many other countries, bra sizes are typically expressed as a combination of a number and a letter, such as 34C or 36D.

Here’s what each part of the bra size means:

Band Size: The band size is represented by the number (e.g., 34 or 36). It corresponds to the measurement of your ribcage, just under your bust. This measurement is usually taken in inches, but it can vary depending on the sizing system used in your region.

Cup Size: The cup size is represented by a letter (e.g., A, B, C, D). It is determined by measuring around the fullest part of your bust and then subtracting your band size from that measurement. The difference in inches or centimeters corresponds to a specific cup size.

1-inch (2.5 cm) difference: A cup

2-inch (5 cm) difference: B cup

3-inch (7.5 cm) difference: C cup

4-inch (10 cm) difference: D cup

And so on…

So, if your band size is 34 inches and your bust measurement is 36 inches, the difference is 2 inches, which corresponds to a B cup. Therefore, your bra size would be 34B.

It’s important to note that bra sizing can vary between brands and styles, and different countries may use slightly different sizing systems. Also, a well-fitting bra should provide both comfort and support, so it’s essential to consider both the band and cup size when determining your ideal fit. If you’re unsure about your bra size, it’s a good idea to get professionally fitted at a lingerie store, especially if you have any doubts about the accuracy of your measurements.

How to Measure Bra Size

Measuring your bra size correctly is essential for finding a comfortable and supportive fit. Here’s a step-by-step guide on how to measure your bra size at home:

You will need:

A soft measuring tape

A mirror

A well-fitting, non-padded bra

A piece of paper and pen

Step 1: Wear the Right Bra Wear a non-padded bra that fits you well. This will help you get the most accurate measurements.

Step 2: Stand in Front of a Mirror Stand in front of a full-length mirror so you can see your bust clearly.

Step 3: Measure Your Band Size Follow these sub-steps to determine your band size:

Measure around your ribcage, right under your bust. Keep the measuring tape snug but not too tight. Make sure it’s parallel to the ground. This measurement is your band size.

If the measurement is an even number, add 4 inches (10 cm). If it’s an odd number, add 5 inches (12.5 cm) to get your band size. For example, if you measure 30 inches, add 4 inches to get a band size of 34. If you measure 31 inches, add 5 inches to get a band size of 36.

Step 4: Measure Your Bust Size Now, measure your bust size. Follow these sub-steps:

Measure around the fullest part of your bust while keeping the tape snug but not tight. Make sure the tape is parallel to the ground.

Step 5: Calculate Your Cup Size To calculate your cup size, subtract your band size (Step 3) from your bust measurement (Step 4). Use the difference to determine your cup size based on the following scale:

1 inch (2.5 cm) difference: A cup

2 inches (5 cm) difference: B cup

3 inches (7.5 cm) difference: C cup

4 inches (10 cm) difference: D cup

5 inches (12.5 cm) difference: DD (E) cup

6 inches (15 cm) difference: DDD (F) cup

7 inches (17.5 cm) difference: G cup

And so on…

For example, if your band size is 34 inches (Step 3) and your bust measurement is 36 inches (Step 4), the difference is 2 inches. In this case, your cup size is a B.

Step 6: Determine Your Bra Size Combine your band size (Step 3) and cup size (Step 5) to determine your bra size. For example, if your band size is 34 inches and your cup size is B, your bra size is 34B.

Keep in mind that bra sizing can vary between brands and styles, so it’s a good idea to try on a few bras in your calculated size to ensure the best fit. Additionally, factors like weight loss, weight gain, and pregnancy can change your bra size, so it’s essential to re-measure periodically to ensure you’re wearing the right size.

How to Measure Your Bra Band Size

To measure your bra band size, you’ll need a soft measuring tape and follow these steps:

Wear a Non-Padded Bra: Before you start measuring, make sure you are wearing a non-padded bra that fits you well. Padded bras can add extra bulk, which may affect the accuracy of your measurements.

Stand Up Straight: Stand in front of a mirror with your back straight. This will ensure that your posture doesn’t skew the measurement.

Measure Around Your Ribcage: Use the soft measuring tape to measure around your ribcage, right under your bust. Keep the tape snug but not too tight. Make sure it’s parallel to the ground and remains level all the way around your body.

Take the Measurement in Inches or Centimeters: Note the measurement in inches or centimeters, depending on your preference and the units used in your region. If you’re measuring in inches, round the measurement to the nearest whole number.

Add 4 or 5 Inches (10 or 12.5 cm): In most cases, you’ll add either 4 inches (10 cm) or 5 inches (12.5 cm) to your ribcage measurement, depending on whether it’s an even or odd number:

If your ribcage measurement is an even number, add 4 inches.

If your ribcage measurement is an odd number, add 5 inches.

For example, if your ribcage measurement is 30 inches, you would add 4 inches, resulting in a band size of 34 inches.

Determine Your Bra Band Size: The final number you get after adding 4 or 5 inches is your band size. For example, if you added 4 inches to your ribcage measurement of 30 inches, your band size would be 34.

Remember that the band size is just one part of your bra size. To get your complete bra size, you’ll also need to measure your bust size to determine the cup size. The band size and cup size together make up your full bra size. So, once you have your band size, follow the steps to measure your bust size as well, as described in a previous response, and then you can determine your complete bra size (e.g., 34B, 36C, etc.).

How Do I Work Out My Cup Size

To work out your cup size, you’ll need to measure your bust size and then calculate the difference between your band size and your bust measurement. Here’s how to do it:

Measure Your Band Size:

Start by wearing a well-fitting, non-padded bra.

Stand in front of a mirror with your back straight.

Use a soft measuring tape to measure around your ribcage, right under your bust. Make sure the tape is snug but not too tight and is parallel to the ground.

If the measurement is an even number, add 4 inches (10 cm) to it. If it’s an odd number, add 5 inches (12.5 cm). This adjusted measurement is your band size.

For example, if your ribcage measurement is 31 inches, you would add 5 inches, resulting in a band size of 36.

Measure Your Bust Size:

Keep the measuring tape around your back and bring it around to the fullest part of your bust. Ensure that the tape is snug but not tight and remains parallel to the ground.

Calculate the Cup Size:

Subtract your band size (as calculated in step 1) from your bust measurement (as measured in step 2). The result will determine your cup size.

Here’s a simple cup size guide based on the difference between your band and bust measurements:

1-inch (2.5 cm) difference: A cup

2-inch (5 cm) difference: B cup

3-inch (7.5 cm) difference: C cup

4-inch (10 cm) difference: D cup

5-inch (12.5 cm) difference: DD (E) cup

6-inch (15 cm) difference: DDD (F) cup

7-inch (17.5 cm) difference: G cup

And so on…

For example, if your band size is 36 inches (as calculated in step 1) and your bust measurement is 38 inches, the difference is 2 inches. This corresponds to a B cup. Therefore, your bra size would be 36B.

Keep in mind that the sizing system may vary slightly between brands and countries, so it’s always a good idea to try on bras in your calculated size to ensure the best fit. Additionally, factors like weight changes and pregnancy can affect your bra size, so it’s a good practice to re-measure periodically to ensure you’re wearing the right size.

How Do I Know If My Bra Fits Properly?

Knowing if your bra fits properly is crucial for both comfort and support. Here are some signs to look for to determine if your bra fits correctly:

Band:

The band should sit horizontally around your ribcage and should feel snug but not tight. You should be able to slide two fingers underneath the band comfortably.

If the band rides up your back or feels too loose, it’s a sign that it’s too big. In contrast, if it digs into your skin, it’s too tight.

Cup:

Your breasts should fill out the cups fully without any spillage or gaps. If you have excess breast tissue spilling over the top, sides, or bottom of the cups, the cups are too small.

If you have extra space in the cups and they wrinkle or gap, the cups are too big.

Center Gore:

The center gore (the piece of fabric that connects the two cups in the front) should lay flat against your chest. There should be no space between the gore and your skin.

If the center gore doesn’t lie flat or digs into your chest, the bra may not be the right style or size for you.

Underwire:

If your bra has underwires, they should follow the natural curve of your breasts and lie flat against your ribcage without poking into your breast tissue or your skin.

If the underwires are digging into your breast tissue, the cups may be too small. If they poke your skin or feel uncomfortable, it might indicate that the bra is the wrong size or style for your body shape.

Straps:

The straps should stay in place on your shoulders without slipping off or digging into your skin. You should be able to adjust them to a comfortable length.

If you find yourself constantly readjusting the straps, they may be too tight or too loose.

Comfort:

Your bra should feel comfortable to wear throughout the day. If it feels painful, restrictive, or you can’t wait to take it off, it’s a sign that it doesn’t fit properly.

Appearance:

A well-fitting bra should enhance your natural shape and provide a smooth silhouette under clothing.

If your bra creates lumps, bumps, or bulges, it may be the wrong size or style.

Breast Position:

Your breasts should be centered on your chest, and they should not be spilling out to the sides or drooping downward.

Regular Bra Maintenance:

Bras can lose their shape and support over time. Make sure to replace bras as needed, especially if the elastic in the band becomes stretched out.

If you notice any of these signs that your bra doesn’t fit properly, it’s a good idea to get professionally fitted or try on different sizes and styles to find the one that suits your body shape best. Your comfort and the support your bra provides are essential for your overall well-being.

Do You Have the Right Bra Size?

The only way to tell whether the bra size given to you by a bra size calculator and chart is right is to put it to the test. Try on bras in your size from dissimilar brands and see whether you get the same soothe and support from each one.

What the right fit feels like:

1. The straps stay put on your shoulders and don’t hollow out in

2. The band sits snugly against your back on any hook and eye, ideally the loosest one. There should only be enough room to slide one finger underneath the band

3. The cups properly cover up your breasts with no overflow or gaps

4. The underwire sits comfortably under your breasts

You can also look at it the other way and determine whether you have the wrong bra size based on the tell-tale signs of a bad bra fit: cup gaps, straps and bands that are either too loose or stretched, band riding up, etc.

What the wrong fit feels like:

1. The straps dig into your shoulders leaving unbearable marks, or slide off, especially if they’re adjusted to the tightest fit

2. The band feels too tight or loose, especially if it squeezes or rides upon the loosest hook and eye or slides around on the tightest hook and eye

3. Your breasts overflow out of the cups or the cups have gaps

4. The underwire sits on top of your breasts.

Are You Wearing the Right Bra Size?

Here are a few blabbermouth signs that you may not be wearing the right bra size: wrinkling in the cups, underwire poking the sides of your breasts, a band that rides up, cup spillage, slipping straps, or a bra that hikes up when you lift your arms, says Sandi Simon, a fit consultant at Bra Smyth, in New York City.

Keep in mind that certain factors can cause you to change bra size, a weight gain or loss, a new exercise routine, pregnancy, and a change of diet among them.

If you suffer from any of the fit issues above, head to a specialized bra fitter or bust out the measuring tape and follow the steps here to measure your bra size at home.

Determine Your Band Size

At the same time as braless or wearing a non-padded bra, use a measuring ribbon to measure around your upper body directly under your bust, wear a bra band would sit. The tape should be level and very comfortable. Round to the nearest whole number.

If the number is even, add four inches. If it’s odd, add five. Your band size is the sum of this calculation.

Take Your Bust Measurement

Enfold the measuring tape to some extent with a loose knot around the fullest part of your chest (at nipple level). Round to the nearest whole number.

Calculate Your Cup Size

Take away your calculated band size (Step 1) from your bust measurement (Step 2) and refer to the bra cup size chart here. Your bra size is your band size with your cup size. Example: 37 inches (bust) – 34 inches (band) = 3 inches. That’s a 34C.

Know How to Size up or Down Properly

If you need to go down a cup size for fit, go up one band size, and associate versa. For example, if a 34C is too big for you in the cups, move to a 36B.

Use the bra size chart here to make sure you are moving up or down a bra size correctly, and remember that your bra size might change to some extent depending on the brand or type of bra. It may take some examination and error to find the perfect fit.

(FAQs)

Q. How do you determine cup size?

A. The most common way to calculate your cup size is by subtracting your band size from your bust size and using the difference to find your cup size according to a bra size chart.

Q. Which is bigger cup size B or C?

A. Here’s a chart of standard size differences and how they equate to cup sizes: If your bust size is less than 1 inch bigger than your band size, you’re a cup size AA. 2-inch difference = B. 3-inch difference = C.

Q. Which is perfect breast size?

A. It turns out, over half of women polled thought a C cup was the perfect fit. At the same time, close to 26 percent favored a B cup. Nearly 2 percent said an A cup was their preferred breast quantity.

Q. Is 36B a good size?

A. Yes, it’s pretty small in the cup size. But a little bit larger than normal in the measurement size. (A 32B makes more sense. 36B, for a 26-year-old, should be perfect and preferred size considering the given weight and height.

Q. What is perfect body size for female?

A. The specific size of 36–24–36 inches (90-60-90 centimeters) have over and over again been given as the “ideal”, or “hourglass” size for women since at least the 1960s.

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